RACHEL'S DANCE CONNECTION

                   BELLY DANCING FOR FUN AND EXERCISE

 

Join Rachel Ferguson on Sunday's in Peachtree City from 6p-7p and at the Sharpsburg Community Center on Wednesday’s from 6p – 7p for this exciting class.  Students must be at least 13 years old to participate.This is also a great mother and daughter activity. 

Classes are $25.00 for six weeks session. 

What exactly is Belly Dance

Description:

BELLY DANCE FOR FUN AND EXERSICE... This is a WONDERFUL art form full of expression and fluidity. You will learn to isolate different parts of the body while getting and amazing workout. Join us now.   Contact Beverly for more information at bfergus1@bellsouth.net

This is great fun allowing you to become more at ease with movements of the body, flexibility, muscle tone, less stiffness of joints, posture & fluidity. No one should allow their muscles & joints to go without exercise. It is a great hour’s workout literally from head to toe. It is a cultural art form of dance. You learn to move to the rhythm of the exciting Middle Eastern music.

 

 

 

 

 

Hire Earth Wind and Veils Troup for Restaurants, Weddings, Bachelorette parties, Corporate events or other special celebrations.   What a unique and elegant form of entertainment.

 We can also be hired for private lessons or workshops.

 

 

BELLY DANCE HISTORY 

Bellydance is vast and ever evolving.  There are as many styles of bellydance as there are countries in the Middle East!  (And let’s not forget about Morocco, Algeria, Tunisia & Libya.) Then there is America’s distinct version “ATS” & “ITS” that has emerged out of California).  Bellydance is known by many names - Oriental dance, Middle Eastern dance, & Raks Sharki to name a few.  Beginners are often confused about the many styles of dance and the rich cultures of the countries where they originated.  Let's delve in!


I have found that bellydance history varies greatly depending on who is telling it!!!  There are MANY misconceptions out there.  We have all heard some. Namely, the harem fantasy of seduction invented by Hollywood to "satisfy men's carnal lusts".  ~ Insert eye roll~  There is much debate among historians & dance enthusiasts about the origins of the dance.  A common adopted story by dancers is that bellydance started out as an ancient birthing dance.  “Belly historians” haven’t come up with a whole lot of evidence to support this charming (but, fictional?) theory.  I would like to believe it.  There is little to tell us exactly how the dance was executed centuries ago & too many theories to list.  Pictoral or written, the documentation can be interpreted very differently.  

So, where does bellydance come from you say?  In short (VERY short), bellydance has evolved from a variety of folk dances from many countries in the Middle East, North Africa, the  Mediterranean & Asia Minor.  In most cases elements have been fused together.  In the states (as well as “over there”) most dancers do not dance any pure form of the dance. However, there are many characteristic movements in the dance that connect them – the curving patterns, the use of the torso, the swaying hips, etc.  In other words, many of the same movements are found throughout, just given different names.  

In America the majority of bellydancers you come across are female…”embracing their inner Goddess”.  But, let’s not forget that men have been bellydancing just as long as women!  Not such a strange notion in the East.  Consider how dance is such an integral part of life in these countries.  (By the way, bellydancers come in all shapes, sizes, races, sexes & ages!)

How has bellydance evolved over the years?  For one, what began as simple dances performed in small spaces has become more elaborate for the stage.  Hollywood had it’s influence – even in the East. In many countries bellydance grew beyond dancing in the home or in clubs.  Social dances were transformed to appeal to different audiences.  Adding spins & travelling steps were a necessity to fill the space of a stage & to keep the dance interesting.  Famous Egyptian choreographers even added Russian ballet to the mix. 

I could go on and on…but, I’ll spare you! Understanding the variety of customs and cultures within the dances can be a bit daunting to the new dancer.  I am not a great historian by any means – I have barely skimmed the surface here.   

Many dancers will gravitate towards a favorite style.  Perhaps for the moves – or the music & costuming that may go with the style. I love all forms of bellydance!  Each in it’s uniqueness, is lovely.   



Where can you find out more about bellydance history?  Here are some links that may be helpful.

http://www.aleenah.com/history.html

http://people.uncw.edu/deagona/raqs/origins.htm

http://www.shira.net/

http://www.casbahdance.org/

http://www.bellydance.org/articles/what_is_bellydance.html

 I have found that bellydance history varies greatly depending on who is telling it!!!  There are MANY misconceptions out there.  We have all heard some. Namely, the harem fantasy of seduction invented by Hollywood to "satisfy men's carnal lusts".  ~ Insert eye roll~  There is much debate among historians & dance enthusiasts about the origins of the dance.  A common adopted story by dancers is that bellydance started out as an ancient birthing dance.  “Belly historians” haven’t come up with a whole lot of evidence to support this charming (but, fictional?) theory.  I would like to believe it.  There is little to tell us exactly how the dance was executed centuries ago & too many theories to list.  Pictoral or written, the documentation can be interpreted very differently.  


So, where does bellydance come from you say?  In short (VERY short), bellydance has evolved from a variety of folk dances from many countries in the Middle East, North Africa, the  Mediterranean & Asia Minor.  In most cases elements have been fused together.  In the states (as well as “over there”) most dancers do not dance any pure form of the dance. However, there are many characteristic movements in the dance that connect them – the curving patterns, the use of the torso, the swaying hips, etc.  In other words, many of the same movements are found throughout, just given different names.  

In America the majority of bellydancers you come across are female…”embracing their inner Goddess”.  But, let’s not forget that men have been bellydancing just as long as women!  Not such a strange notion in the East.  Consider how dance is such an integral part of life in these countries.  (By the way, bellydancers come in all shapes, sizes, races, sexes & ages!)